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Student Organization Promotes Breast Cancer Awareness


Arkansas Tech University students are thinking pink as part of breast cancer awareness month.

Members of the Zeta Tau Alpha sorority at Arkansas Tech hosted Think Pink Week on the Russellville campus. 

From kissing away cancer to a yogurt-eating and lid-collection contest-- the group has hosted numerous fundraisers to raise money for breast cancer research education.

Prior to Arkansas Tech's football game Saturday, Zeta Tau Alpha will host a balloon release honoring breast cancer victims and survivors.

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

(LITTLE ROCK) —The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) and local school districts statewide are again offering the seasonal flu vaccine to school children in grades K-12 beginning the week of October 8. School clinics will be going on for the next several months.

Seasonal flu vaccine is not required for children to attend school, but it is highly recommended.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) recommend everyone aged 6 months and older receive a seasonal flu vaccine every year.  Seasonal flu causes children to miss school and their parents to miss work.   If you have insurance, the ADH will ask your insurance company to pay for the cost of giving the vaccine.  If you do not have insurance or your insurance company does not pay, the shot will be no charge to you.

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

Health Status of African-Americans Detailed in  UAMS College of Public Health Report

LITTLE ROCK – Mortality rates of African-Americans were significantly higher than those of Caucasians for most cancers, HIV and homicide, but lower for motor vehicle crashes and suicide, according to a recent report compiled by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health.

That’s just one of many findings detailed in a joint study focusing on the health status of African-Americans in Arkansas compiled by UAMS and supported by the Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC), the Arkansas Center for Health Disparities and the Arkansas Prevention Research Center. The full report can be found here: www.uams.edu/coph/reports/ or www.arminorityhealth.com/reports_updates.html.

Pope ranks 6 in number of healthy Arkansas counties

Pope ranks 6 in number of healthy Arkansas counties

County-by-county rankings show what influences health, longevity
 
The third annual County Health Rankings were released Tuesday. The Rankings are an annual check-up that measure how healthy people are and how long they live in more than 3,000 counties and the District of Columbia.

These New Ads Might Shock You – They Might Also Save Your Life

These New Ads Might Shock You – They Might Also Save Your Life

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has launched a national education campaign that depicts the harsh reality of illness and damage real people suffer as a result of smoking and exposure to secondhand smoke.  The ads show the toll smoking-related illnesses take on real people and their loved ones.  Viewers in Arkansas will see the ads from March 19 to June 9.
 

Get your plate in shape

Get your plate in shape

Coalition Educates Children, Adults on What, When and How to eat to be Healthy, Combat Obesity

LITTLE ROCK, AR (Feb. 28, 2012) – March is National Nutrition Month® and a good time to “Get Your Plate in Shape.” Arkansas was named the ninth most obese state in the country, according to the eighth annual F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America's Future 2011, a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). In addition, nearly one-third of our state’s adults – 30.6 percent – are obese.

While these statistics are staggering, they represent only part of the health problem in Arkansas.  Obesity is a primary contributor to serious chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease.  According to the Arkansas Department of Health, 53 percent of Arkansas adults are living with at least one chronic disease.